TV 🛡 Game of Thrones—BR's Best Moments: And now our rate has ended.





Arguably the most iconic dialogue scene to come out of the titular 'Game of Thrones' series, this scene is incredibly effective in its thrill. After a season-long build-up, Ned has finally come to understand the truth behind Cersei and Jaime, both of which the show had drawn on the antagonistic side so far due to narrative conditions but which turned out to be for the better to truly heighten the underlying danger towards the series’ then-current protagonist at this moment.
While Ned confronting Cersei on the truth was an honorable intent to give her and her children a way out, it was also an obviously naive and weak power play that can only be interpreted as the moment he signed his own death sentence.

This memorable confrontation is also a turning point in the debut season where, after this, the story strongly gains momentum and pace and feels largely exciting thanks to how patiently the show had worked towards the impending doom to come. Knowing Ned's fate makes the rewatch value of this scene under a different light even greater.


Points: 287
(Ridley #18; Allstar #17; Subby #9; bluth #23; Godrey #17; Penk #3)


Game of Trivia: Penk KNOWS that there is no middle ground so he once more gave his everything to a dialogue moment and really made this one RISE. But even so, this one was voted by a fair amount of participants and proved to be quite popular and thankfully it did, can't have a best moments without this one!

COMMENTS

Ridley:
In the game of bussies, you get eaten or DIE.

bluth: the title track has to be included

Godrey: We danced on the H of the Hollywood sign.
 
Comment

sloth

&Y.




Arguably the most iconic dialogue scene to come out of the titular 'Game of Thrones' series, this scene is incredibly effective in its thrill. After a season-long build-up, Ned has finally come to understand the truth behind Cersei and Jaime, both of which the show had drawn on the antagonistic side so far due to narrative conditions but which turned out to be for the better to truly heighten the underlying danger towards the series’ then-current protagonist at this moment.
While Ned confronting Cersei on the truth was an honorable intent to give her and her children a way out, it was also an obviously naive and weak power play that can only be interpreted as the moment he signed his own death sentence.

This memorable confrontation is also a turning point in the debut season where, after this, the story strongly gains momentum and pace and feels largely exciting thanks to how patiently the show had worked towards the impending doom to come. Knowing Ned's fate makes the rewatch value of this scene under a different light even greater.


Points: 287
(Ridley #18; Allstar #17; Subby #9; bluth #23; Godrey #17; Penk #3)


Game of Trivia: Penk KNOWS that there is no middle ground so he once more gave his everything to a dialogue moment and really made this one RISE. But even so, this one was voted by a fair amount of participants and proved to be quite popular and thankfully it did, can't have a best moments without this one!

COMMENTS

Ridley:
In the game of bussies, you get eaten or DIE.

bluth: the title track has to be included

Godrey: We danced on the H of the Hollywood sign.
ugh what a pivotal moment

this is equivalent to like when you're watching a tv / movie and they finally explain the meaning of the title to you
 
Comment
Tyrion kills twyin?




This, to me, is by far the most intimately tragic murder of the show and, ironically, in some ways resembles one to come just five years later in the series' finale. Where Jon murdering Daenerys fell flat, this one manages to squeeze out every last bit of tragedy, misery and gloom when Tyrion is delivered another gut punch after Shae not only betrays him, but also sleeps with his father out of vengeful spite. Tyrion's revenge on her never feels like a cathartic act of violence as much as one that's drained in the bitter tears of a man whose heart has been broken by the one person in his life that has made him feel desirable, heard, seen, loved, and sheltered.

When Tyrion murders his father Tywin in the least respectful, possibly most embarrassing, spot for a man all about legacy, the same scene uses its previous tragic tone to accentuate the following moment of purgative release of his feelings. Tyrion's bottled up anger and fury towards the lack of respect and credit he's been given all his life might have been freed during his trial and through Shae's actions, but it finds closure only here where this life-long agony is channeled into the murdering of his father - the person that has planted the clinging roots of his painful insecurities in first place.


Points: 289
(Ryan #14; Allstar #10; Dalty #5; bluth #24; Penk #16; Matt #15)


Game of Trivia: We have finally reached the moments in which we're going to see more than just a couple of votes and this one is actually only two small points ahead of the ttitle dialogue one. There's quite some variance here from the lowest to the highest tiers of scores but they all agree that this is the ending to Tyrion’s greatest times.

COMMENTS

Ryan: T
he star of the show's greatest moment (fun fact: Tyrion appeared in more episodes than any other character - 5 more than second place, Cersei!). As Bruno has said, Tyrion's murder of Shae is absolutely heartbreaking (especially when compared to Jon killing Dany), and then to follow it up with a death that all viewers wanted to see (AND ON THE SHITTER) is just awesome.

Dalty: Remember back when Tyrion was the best character on the show? I do. Everything that Tyrion had done in the past was building up to this great moment - the final confrontation between father and son. The two men had one of the best dynamics on the show: despite how much Tywin denied it, Tyrion was the one that was most like him. The resentment that had been rising and rising over the first seasons peaked at this powerful climax where Tyrion is forced to murder the woman he loved and killed his father in revenge.

bluth: This sequence has three great parts. the show manages to convey so much emotion and conflict between tyrion and shae without any dialogue, tywin’s death is so poetic as it encapsulates the fetid legacy he’s left for the world despite his obsession with preserving the lannister name, but possibly my favourite part is that closing shot of varys looking towards the red keep, turning back and leaving. it’s then that we really felt that westeros was hitting a turning point - little did we know that the turning point was more so about the decline in writing.
 
Comment

Hello. It is Me.

Prominent Member




This, to me, is by far the most intimately tragic murder of the show and, ironically, in some ways resembles one to come just five years later in the series' finale. Where Jon murdering Daenerys fell flat, this one manages to squeeze out every last bit of tragedy, misery and gloom when Tyrion is delivered another gut punch after Shae not only betrays him, but also sleeps with his father out of vengeful spite. Tyrion's revenge on her never feels like a cathartic act of violence as much as one that's drained in the bitter tears of a man whose heart has been broken by the one person in his life that has made him feel desirable, heard, seen, loved, and sheltered.

When Tyrion murders his father Tywin in the least respectful, possibly most embarrassing, spot for a man all about legacy, the same scene uses its previous tragic tone to accentuate the following moment of purgative release of his feelings. Tyrion's bottled up anger and fury towards the lack of respect and credit he's been given all his life might have been freed during his trial and through Shae's actions, but it finds closure only here where this life-long agony is channeled into the murdering of his father - the person that has planted the clinging roots of his painful insecurities in first place.


Points: 289
(Ryan #14; Allstar #10; Dalty #5; bluth #24; Penk #16; Matt #15)


Game of Trivia: We have finally reached the moments in which we're going to see more than just a couple of votes and this one is actually only two small points ahead of the ttitle dialogue one. There's quite some variance here from the lowest to the highest tiers of scores but they all agree that this is the ending to Tyrion’s greatest times.

COMMENTS

Ryan: T
he star of the show's greatest moment (fun fact: Tyrion appeared in more episodes than any other character - 5 more than second place, Cersei!). As Bruno has said, Tyrion's murder of Shae is absolutely heartbreaking (especially when compared to Jon killing Dany), and then to follow it up with a death that all viewers wanted to see (AND ON THE SHITTER) is just awesome.

Dalty: Remember back when Tyrion was the best character on the show? I do. Everything that Tyrion had done in the past was building up to this great moment - the final confrontation between father and son. The two men had one of the best dynamics on the show: despite how much Tywin denied it, Tyrion was the one that was most like him. The resentment that had been rising and rising over the first seasons peaked at this powerful climax where Tyrion is forced to murder the woman he loved and killed his father in revenge.

bluth: This sequence has three great parts. the show manages to convey so much emotion and conflict between tyrion and shae without any dialogue, tywin’s death is so poetic as it encapsulates the fetid legacy he’s left for the world despite his obsession with preserving the lannister name, but possibly my favourite part is that closing shot of varys looking towards the red keep, turning back and leaving. it’s then that we really felt that westeros was hitting a turning point - little did we know that the turning point was more so about the decline in writing.
I'm stunned this is so low!
 
Comment
Do you think the change from the books to make Tryion more sympathetic in that scene was good or bad?
It makes book Tyrion more complex but I love the tone the show managed to convey with the changes between Tyrion/Shae where, to the audience, something real is truly lost. Ultimately, in both cases, from Tyrion's perception the loss is similar, but for the audience, or me anyway, this one's emotional gravitas hits harder because I know it to be real so I don't mind the downgrade of complexity via Tyrion to make him more sympathetic as he still remained a great character. What did you think?
 
Comment




This, to me, is by far the most intimately tragic murder of the show and, ironically, in some ways resembles one to come just five years later in the series' finale. Where Jon murdering Daenerys fell flat, this one manages to squeeze out every last bit of tragedy, misery and gloom when Tyrion is delivered another gut punch after Shae not only betrays him, but also sleeps with his father out of vengeful spite. Tyrion's revenge on her never feels like a cathartic act of violence as much as one that's drained in the bitter tears of a man whose heart has been broken by the one person in his life that has made him feel desirable, heard, seen, loved, and sheltered.

When Tyrion murders his father Tywin in the least respectful, possibly most embarrassing, spot for a man all about legacy, the same scene uses its previous tragic tone to accentuate the following moment of purgative release of his feelings. Tyrion's bottled up anger and fury towards the lack of respect and credit he's been given all his life might have been freed during his trial and through Shae's actions, but it finds closure only here where this life-long agony is channeled into the murdering of his father - the person that has planted the clinging roots of his painful insecurities in first place.


Points: 289
(Ryan #14; Allstar #10; Dalty #5; bluth #24; Penk #16; Matt #15)


Game of Trivia: We have finally reached the moments in which we're going to see more than just a couple of votes and this one is actually only two small points ahead of the ttitle dialogue one. There's quite some variance here from the lowest to the highest tiers of scores but they all agree that this is the ending to Tyrion’s greatest times.

COMMENTS

Ryan: T
he star of the show's greatest moment (fun fact: Tyrion appeared in more episodes than any other character - 5 more than second place, Cersei!). As Bruno has said, Tyrion's murder of Shae is absolutely heartbreaking (especially when compared to Jon killing Dany), and then to follow it up with a death that all viewers wanted to see (AND ON THE SHITTER) is just awesome.

Dalty: Remember back when Tyrion was the best character on the show? I do. Everything that Tyrion had done in the past was building up to this great moment - the final confrontation between father and son. The two men had one of the best dynamics on the show: despite how much Tywin denied it, Tyrion was the one that was most like him. The resentment that had been rising and rising over the first seasons peaked at this powerful climax where Tyrion is forced to murder the woman he loved and killed his father in revenge.

bluth: This sequence has three great parts. the show manages to convey so much emotion and conflict between tyrion and shae without any dialogue, tywin’s death is so poetic as it encapsulates the fetid legacy he’s left for the world despite his obsession with preserving the lannister name, but possibly my favourite part is that closing shot of varys looking towards the red keep, turning back and leaving. it’s then that we really felt that westeros was hitting a turning point - little did we know that the turning point was more so about the decline in writing.
:0
 
Comment

Subon

🧡
It makes book Tyrion more complex but I love the tone the show managed to convey with the changes between Tyrion/Shae where, to the audience, something real is truly lost. Ultimately, in both cases, from Tyrion's perception the loss is similar, but for the audience, or me anyway, this one's emotional gravitas hits harder because I know it to be real so I don't mind the downgrade of complexity via Tyrion to make him more sympathetic as he still remained a great character. What did you think?
I was more in the camp of missing the complexity to his character tbh but your write-up made me second guess that.
 
Comment
okay, so speaking of male dominated scenes... our next placement is one of them, and one of the show's biggest and most famous moments.

Let's just say... no one could have seen this one coming! ❄
 
Comment




Everyone who is going to watch this show for the first time in future is never going to understand just why 'Hardhome' was hyped up, praised, revered, and deemed so shocking.

This battle sequence was the first huge surprise to series fanatics and book readers alike in which all of Hardhome happens off-page without Jon's presence in it.
It is also placed at a point of the series where the White Walkers and their army hadn't appeared for almost two seasons and seemingly turned into a forgotten afterthought - it turns out, quite intentionally so, to drive the chilling shock factor of the Night King's parade of violence and menace home even more so.

As Miguel's first huge showpiece, the battle sequence works as a terrific demonstration in how to structure an action scene:
From creating heartfelt mini-arcs, such as that of Wildling mother Karsi who was introduced and died in this episode, to establish potent emotional stakes, to the ways Sapochnik successfully constructs a near claustrophobic environmental stage that makes the later surplus of wights and White Walkers feel even more dangerous, up to his brilliant use of sound - or lack thereof - in the sequence's famous, final moments that drive home the stakes that made 'Hardhome' feel so pivotal:

The deafening silence and that piercing look of the Night King, as his army of the dead rises in the back, reads as a scarily intimidating provocation to Jon, whose look seems to portray all the bleak hopelessness in face of the growing threat he just barely escaped that the audience had no time to fully process during the destructive chaos just moments before.


Points: 298
(Ryan #7; Ridley #15; Dalty #12; Matt #12; Sloth #4)


Game of Trivia: I realize I praised this one quite a lot in my write-up and still didn't vote for it, and quickly forgot why I snubbed it until I realized my bias towards the show's smaller scenes and the fact I'm not sure this is as great without the surprise factor and how much of this is still effective after the show's final season.
Anyway, this ALMOST didn't make the cut AT ALL which was really one of the biggest shocks to me, until the final two submissions by Matt and Andy catapulted it into the position I probably would have predicted it to end up in.​

COMMENTS:

Ryan:
Motherfucking. ice. zombies. Do I have to say anything else?

Ridley: I'll always take personal character moments over big battles but "Hardhome" not only served as type of battle never seen before on Game Of Thrones, but sold me on the White Walkers and Night King as seemingly undefeatable threats.

Dalty: Great action and finally a reason to get excited about the White Walkers (unfortunately for no reason). It was thrilling and exciting and visually an incredible spectacle. One of my favorite episodes. I don't have a whole lot to say about it other than that. Sapochnik did what he had to do.
 
Comment

Subon

🧡
Yeah, count me with the girls who prefer the talk and foreplay to the action

I like this one more than battle of the bastards tho!
 
Comment

sloth

&Y.




Everyone who is going to watch this show for the first time in future is never going to understand just why 'Hardhome' was hyped up, praised, revered, and deemed so shocking.

This battle sequence was the first huge surprise to series fanatics and book readers alike in which all of Hardhome happens off-page without Jon's presence in it.
It is also placed at a point of the series where the White Walkers and their army hadn't appeared for almost two seasons and seemingly turned into a forgotten afterthought - it turns out, quite intentionally so, to drive the chilling shock factor of the Night King's parade of violence and menace home even more so.

As Miguel's first huge showpiece, the battle sequence works as a terrific demonstration in how to structure an action scene:
From creating heartfelt mini-arcs, such as that of Wildling mother Karsi who was introduced and died in this episode, to establish potent emotional stakes, to the ways Sapochnik successfully constructs a near claustrophobic environmental stage that makes the later surplus of wights and White Walkers feel even more dangerous, up to his brilliant use of sound - or lack thereof - in the sequence's famous, final moments that drive home the stakes that made 'Hardhome' feel so pivotal:

The deafening silence and that piercing look of the Night King, as his army of the dead rises in the back, reads as a scarily intimidating provocation to Jon, whose look seems to portray all the bleak hopelessness in face of the growing threat he just barely escaped that the audience had no time to fully process during the destructive chaos just moments before.


Points: 298
(Ryan #7; Ridley #15; Dalty #12; Matt #12; Sloth #4)


Game of Trivia: I realize I praised this one quite a lot in my write-up and still didn't vote for it, and quickly forgot why I snubbed it until I realized my bias towards the show's smaller scenes and the fact I'm not sure this is as great without the surprise factor and how much of this is still effective after the show's final season.
Anyway, this ALMOST didn't make the cut AT ALL which was really one of the biggest shocks to me, until the final two submissions by Matt and Andy catapulted it into the position I probably would have predicted it to end up in.​

COMMENTS:

Ryan:
Motherfucking. ice. zombies. Do I have to say anything else?

Ridley: I'll always take personal character moments over big battles but "Hardhome" not only served as type of battle never seen before on Game Of Thrones, but sold me on the White Walkers and Night King as seemingly undefeatable threats.

Dalty: Great action and finally a reason to get excited about the White Walkers (unfortunately for no reason). It was thrilling and exciting and visually an incredible spectacle. One of my favorite episodes. I don't have a whole lot to say about it other than that. Sapochnik did what he had to do.
fff i did not mean to rank this so high

i included it in my list tho cuz it was they FINALLY showed the night king after blueballing us for several seasons lmao
 
Comment

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