Album Lana Del Rey - 'Norman Fucking Rockwell' (2019)

DeletedUser

Great songs but lacking a bit conceptually. Seems Lana is transitioning into more of a personal singer-songwriter here which is fine, but I did like the aesthetically driven nature of her first few records. Also suffers a bit from the boldest and most experimental songs being released as singles nearly a year early. hope is a dangerous thing's meaning and message was definitely undercut by being a random single when fans were just desperate for new material.
 

Genos

skimbleshanks
As I've mentioned previously I've been... let's just say quite removed from the LDR fandom due to being totally unmoved by her previous efforts Lust for Life and Honeymoon so, truthfully, I went into NFR! with no expectations (I also didn't listen to any of the released singles so everything is new to me) and it utterly blew me away. The title track immediately pulled me in and by the time the back half of the song soars into an operatic crescendo sonically evocative of the luminosity of Sissy Spacek in Terrence Malick's Badlands I knew I was in for a treat. Her voice fading out as she repeats "Blue" in one of the lushest tones I've ever heard was all I needed to be on board. Lana really has a knack for ending songs and I don't think anything in her oeuvre represents that theory better than Venice Bitch. Laced with swirling guitars and crashes and a myriad of other brash sounds beautifully at odds with her voice, it's like Kid A guided under the feminine touch.

Unfortunately, F*ck it I love you & Doin' Time are the ebbs of the album but they seem to no longer matter when the string of Love Song-Cinnamon Girl-How to disappear elevates Lana into such a stratosphere that I wonder if I'm genuinely listening to her magnum opus. Love Song, in particular, is one of the most tender and heartfelt declarations of love in quite a while. Lana sings as a wayward woman, hardened through years of failing to reach the Americana dream but by the album's closer, hope is a dangerous thing... there's peculiar ownership that has drifted over all her words uttered up to this point. The dream is buried but along the way, she's accepted life and love and all the hardships that come with it and is now in the bliss of freedom.

All in all, NFR! is a monumental work for an artist who I pretty much gave up on. It's relentless and at the same time a meandering journey into a tormented, frail, and, somehow, self-aware mind. Endlessly cycling from poignant, soft, fragile, to ethereal, tremendous, biting moods without ever coming close to veering off the road.

:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:
 

hyena queen (life ruined)

its me your australian bitch
As I've mentioned previously I've been... let's just say quite removed from the LDR fandom due to being totally unmoved by her previous efforts Lust for Life and Honeymoon so, truthfully, I went into NFR! with no expectations (I also didn't listen to any of the released singles so everything is new to me) and it utterly blew me away. The title track immediately pulled me in and by the time the back half of the song soars into an operatic crescendo sonically evocative of the luminosity of Sissy Spacek in Terrence Malick's Badlands I knew I was in for a treat. Her voice fading out as she repeats "Blue" in one of the lushest tones I've ever heard was all I needed to be on board. Lana really has a knack for ending songs and I don't think anything in her oeuvre represents that theory better than Venice Bitch. Laced with swirling guitars and crashes and a myriad of other brash sounds beautifully at odds with her voice, it's like Kid A guided under the feminine touch.

Unfortunately, F*ck it I love you & Doin' Time are the ebbs of the album but they seem to no longer matter when the string of Love Song-Cinnamon Girl-How to disappear elevates Lana into such a stratosphere that I wonder if I'm genuinely listening to her magnum opus. Love Song, in particular, is one of the most tender and heartfelt declarations of love in quite a while. Lana sings as a wayward woman, hardened through years of failing to reach the Americana dream but by the album's closer, hope is a dangerous thing... there's peculiar ownership that has drifted over all her words uttered up to this point. The dream is buried but along the way, she's accepted life and love and all the hardships that come with it and is now in the bliss of freedom.

All in all, NFR! is a monumental work for an artist who I pretty much gave up on. It's relentless and at the same time a meandering journey into a tormented, frail, and, somehow, self-aware mind. Endlessly cycling from poignant, soft, fragile, to ethereal, tremendous, biting moods without ever coming close to veering off the road.

:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:
I think you should give Huntymoon and Lackluster for Life a second chance tbh :supreme6::glam: Love this review tho my mykonos god
 

jupiter

fka bluth fka miss anthropocene
i find it interesting that whenever lana releases an album there’s always some exclamation that “this is the record she was always meant to release!”, as if for all these years she’s been shackled by some hidden, nefarious puppeteer. is this meant to express some retrospective dissatisfaction with the rest of her discography, or are people three albums late only just realising that the ldr character probably died with honeymoon, if not ultraviolence? well, i suppose it reflects that lana’s songwriting enters more personal rumination territory with each release, which people naturally perceive as a better place for her over lana del rey-artifice which is still scarred to this day by memories of angry snl mobs and backlash. granted, it is nice to hear lana when she feels like she’s coming from a more genuine and heartfelt place, but it doesn’t mean that this album doesn’t suffer the same fate as most lana albums which has a muddy middle to back-end, a symptom of lana’s main strength being dramatic beginnings and long, mournful endings. a comfortable album through and through, probably would have more of an impact had the best songs not been released beforehand. a 3.5, probably.
 
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